Weapons EVERYWHERE!

The current Deathwing commission has now taken me onto a FW Dreadnought. The client has asked me to paint the dreadnought up, but with magnetizing the arms for weapon refits. As I am new to magnetizing weapons for units/ models, I will hopefully be able to post some of the progress here for you all to see. It should be a lot of fun.

Dread weapons

As you can see here, the array of weapon options here is just simply staggering. I would love to really see just how each of the different combos are against various enemies in a game of 40k.

I just have a final right arm to add also, it being a close combat weapon. Next step will be the washing of the resin, since FW use a release agent on all their castings, then onto a coat of paint..

I will be joined by a painting buddy on what we deem to be known as Dreadnought Wednesay. He intends to purchasing a new dreadnought and painting it up with me.

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The Angels of Death

Here we see a recently completed commission for a client wanting six heavy weapons for his Blood Angel tactical squads.

Image

This was a particularly enjoyable commission in that it was super easy to achieve a stunning result in no time at all.

The scary thing is now I will just have to paint up my own unit for my army.

Iyanden Farseer eBay Auction

G’day gamers!

Today sees a brand new eBay auction. Seismic Studio has an Eldar Craftworld Iyanden Farseer up and the auction has seen a lot of traffic so far.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/331101361573?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1558.l2649

 

This model is such a beautiful sculpt, it just epitomises the alien realm of the Warhammer 40k universe. It has always been my view that Iyanden are THE craftworld of the Eldar race. Their craftworld is a symbol of a dying race and their wraithguard troops are ghosts of a once thriving civilization.

I have really enjoyed painting up this Farseer and after I get some commissions done I will maybe have time to paint up a squad of guardians and maybe a wraithknight. In the meantime, check out the auction on eBay. Make a bid today.

 

New Year, New Models On The Horizon…

It’s been a little while since the last post from the studio as Christmas comes up so fast and then a week later we see in the new year. There are a few things I want to discuss about the hobby, my hobby and where we see things going for the year to come. First, a little housekeeping to take care of:

At new years resolutions are always made and it is about this time after new years most people made ones that they realise,  are far too unrealistic to accomplish. I never make resolutions and I mean I NEVER make resolutions, but I think it is time for me to break this trend and make one:

PAINT MORE MINIATURES.

There it is and without (as they say) further ado, here is the first of my many miniatures to be painted up this year:

Eldar Farseer.

This model is just having the finishing touches put to it, but it is basically done and will be up for sale in the next few days. It’s a model that evokes such imagery of the 41st milennnia and the alien races that lie outside the grasp of the Imperium.

Genestealers.

These classic models are some of the first that I picked up way back in 2nd edition 40k. They have been refined since then and I finally got my hands on a few to paint up. Expect these to show their ugly faces in the upcoming week.

It very exciting to see a new codex, so we will see what it reveals.

So they are just some of the newest miniatures to come out of the studio. I thought I would discuss the news of the finecast production discontinuing, albeit a little old, but we still see the odd model come out, made in resin, so I thought it apt.

It’s from my understanding that I heard the finecast range is finishing up production and I have just a couple of thoughts.

The first thing that comes to mind is just how many people I heard online voicing their opinion about the resin material. I think that it is a huge step for such a massive company like GW to just pull the plug like that. It must have taken a lot of complaints for the company to just cease the manufacturing. Now, I understand that there must be a large portion of the GW product line still to come, but I wonder how long it will be before we will see it completley die off.

I personally only purchased one model from the Finecast range, since there was just so much that I had already to paint, it seemed silly to just run out and add to the huge pile that I have going on, but the one model that I did buy, i has little to no problems with. Two issues I did have was trying to get a power axe bet back straight, even with the use of hot water, it just doesn’t sit straight. The other problem I had was that there was no evidence of bubbles, but, once I began cleaning up the model of mould lines, then I would reveal bubbles and they just kept on coming.

I will be sad to see a product line die off, before, I think that it had time to really reveal it’s potential, but maybe GW cut their losses.

Something else that has piqued my interest is the recent release of the Escalation and Stronghold Assault books. I finally can use my Thunderhawk in regular games, but at what cost? From what I see, the balance is nonexistent and I have two schools of thought on this release.

The first thing is that this is GW and balance had long gone out the window many editions ago. There is some semblance of balance starting to reappear in the newest 6th edition, but that died as soon as allies came into the scene.

The second is that I really feel like this is a great release to spur the recent momentum that I feel that GW have had with the strong Tau, Space Marine, and subsequent digital codex releases. This is a great way for most of us to breathe somemore life into our hobby while the Wintery months are here and we are all stuck inside.

Oh and by the way, speaking of Winter, it was -38 degrees Celsius, with windchill here in Ottawa today, good reason to paint miniatures.

A New Dawn

It’s time to CELEBRATE! Seismic Miniature Painting Studio has made it’s first official sale.

There’s been a little more playing of the new 40k (6th edition) and my opponent caught wind that I had a Black Templar Crusader Squad (essentially it’s a Tactical squad that you can add 10 Neophytes-scouts- to)  that I had intended on selling at some point down the road. I had actually painted them up back in the Templar 5th edition days and the models had just been sitting on a shelf so it was perfect that they do something useful and be SOLD!

Together with some freehand banner work, parchment writing and chapter symbols, I am happy to say that they turned out extremely well.

My client even asked that I match up the base of his existing Emperor’s Champion to the unit; they look fantastic together. It’s amazing just what a cohesive base can do for a unit that was painted by two different people, and given that the unit and the Emperor’s Champion are both black; it helps.

What is perfect is that since he is a regular opponent of mine, I will get to see them whenever I play a game of 40k against him.

Next for my opponent are some of the new plastic sternguard veteran models, the question is: five or ten man unit? Hmmm…

Practice, practice practice

So I felt it was time to work on my non metallic metal (N.M.M.) technique, not just painting N.M.M. silver, but gold too. I looked at a few models that have displayed the technique and decided it was something I can definitely pull off. In research for a step-by-step technique, I would like to source http://warhammer-empire.com/theforum/?topic=10116.0 A great resource for painting NMM. It is a style that I have had many friends ask me to do in the past and I gave it an attempt with my Imperial Fist Lysander and also my Eldar wraithlord and they turned out well to a certain extent; both of these models have picked up painting awards in the past.

I felt that I needed to get back to basics with the technique, since doing yellow NMM takes a lot more than I suspected and I realise now that there’s a fine line between painting NMM gold and simply bright yellow.

I found that I had a dwarven Demon Slayer model that is really quite old now. It is one of my favourite models and I have to say that I have always had a soft spot for dwarves. The contrast that you can achieve with the flesh tones and wacky colour hair is really attractive to me and then there is the ability to do some freehand facial tattoos on some of the more rare units, I wanted to keep this model’s flesh clear of tattoos. They are a slow army in the game, so there was my hesitation; they could do with a little speed.

When I was painting the model, I  painted about 95% of the model, not including the areas that required NMM, then moved into the NMM. Tackling one area of NMM silver first, I just practiced where I felt that the light was going to hit it, with sharp contrasts with areas that had little or no light. It didn’t look especially effective. This was a small mistake, but could be easily corrected. I quickly realised that in order for the technique to look correct, I needed to paint all the areas that required the NMM, as the key its to “trick” the eye into seeing the paint look reflective, when it in fact, is just the contrasts between all the different tones. It is not unlike regular painting, where some kind of visual trickery is used.

Bringing all the NMM together was the final work on the gold NMM. I found this to be a little harder to pull off, since I was using more than three paints (silver NMM actually uses Codex Grey, Skull White and Chaos Black). Gold NMM uses a combination of yellows, browns and finally, a very small amount of Chaos Black, which was my added twist to the great NMM painting guide. Another difference between NMM gold and silver,that I learned from the NMM guide mentioned above, is the lack of use of pure white highlight when painting gold. Many other sites did use a final touch of white to reflect the light, but this really detracted from the overall effect of gold NMM (thanks Quadrille).

I hope you like the finished product, I think that for my first attempt, it turned out pretty well, thanks to Quadrille of http://warhammer-empire.com/theforum/?topic=10116.0, for writing such a helpful guide.

Dwarf Demon Slayer. This was a first attempt of doing NMM with a painting guide, from someone who knows quite a bit about painting in that style

The finished Slayer

Please feel free to post comments on feedback for the model. They are always welcomed.

Hobby Beginnings

So I was introduced to this amazing new hobby, this brand new world that was to me, as cool as Star Wars. This is a world that has such a rich background that it was almost like an overload to my science- fiction senses. I had to do it, I went out and purchased my own copy of Warhammer 40k second edition:

40k 2nd edition

This box set not only had great models, intricate and interesting rules, but most interesting to me at the time was the background to the genesis of a space marine and the history of just how the Emperor was betrayed by Horus, a series that those of us immersed in the hobby have come to understand as The Horus Heresy. This background “fluff” to the creation of a space marine was, well it was absolutely awesome and had me hooked.

My good friend who got me involved in the hobby would play games against me on weekends and sometimes in the evening. Sometimes I would take the Space Marines, sometimes I would play as the Orks, but my calling came in the form of the following three words: The Aurora Chapter.


I had recently bought what was known as the Ultramarine Codex, since I had initially grabbed the Chaos Codex, but I wanted to utilise what was in the core box set. In looking through the Codex, I found it. The colour scheme that would pave the way for the entirety of my 40k hobby life.

To be honest, back in the 2nd ed. days there wasn’t much variation to each of the space marines found in the Codex Ultramarines, so it came down to colour and how they were painted up. But I really gravitated to the simple colour scheme for The Aurora Chapter; deep emerald green, green highlights, shoulder pad trim colour (in the case of the example in the Codex, black) and bone Imperial Eagle.

Sounds simple right? Well, I had also gotten my hands on a painting guide done by ‘Eavy Metal painter Mike McVey. I knew I wanted to be as good as a painter as he is.

Over the next year or so I just kept on painting and painting. I didn’t fall into the trap known as Warcrack 40k, well not yet, or so I had thought.

I will revisit my hobby beginnings in a future post, one where the forces of The Aurora Chapter found their true foe (well my friend Steve found THE army to combat the strength of The Aurora) and just how The Aurora Chapter evolved to battle this bitter enemy.

TO BE CONTINUED…