Salamanders: Fire and Fury

The most recent commission undertaken was a Salamanders Redemptor. This model is one of the newer ones in the Adeptus Astartes range and man, it is one of the coolest to paint and also get a dynamic pose.

Designed to be, arguably, the replacement for the Dreadnought from the power armour Space Marine range. This Primaris Dreadnought towers over the original, white metal one. That piece was released way, way back,circa 1990 has since had many a plastic upgrade to make it a little more substantial, but there is nothing really like this new beast of a walker.

The model was preassembled on receipt and just took a little cleaning up; this is pretty much the state that I received it: ready to go!

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Some initial sculpting to really make this model unique for a Salamander force.

While that was curing, I started construction of the base. I had to cut the feet away, since it was received  glued to the base. Along with custom base sculpting, I used  some Agrellan Earth to get the smaller crackle on the base and Vallejo Ground Texture and finally Mod Podge to seal it all together.

Work with the airbrush soon began and I layed down undercoat, base and preshading with the magnificent tool; it really helps to get the essentials down and ready to go so that you can soon work on the really fun stuff.

 

More areas showing the transitions, now with the addition of the brass (starting to block out where I want it to be brass).

 

Edge highlighting and finishing the brass:

Freehand work. Battle damage, flame icon on chest and Salamanders Chapter symbol:

Completed Redemptor Dreadnought based and painted:

There you have it; I had a lot of fun working on this project. If you have any questions about the process involved, please post in the comments; I am welcome to any questions you may have.

Next piece to add to the Salamander collection is going to be two very different pieces. An Invictor Tactical Warsuit and a 2nd edition 40k Space Marine Rhino.

Practice, practice practice

So I felt it was time to work on my non metallic metal (N.M.M.) technique, not just painting N.M.M. silver, but gold too. I looked at a few models that have displayed the technique and decided it was something I can definitely pull off. In research for a step-by-step technique, I would like to source http://warhammer-empire.com/theforum/?topic=10116.0 A great resource for painting NMM. It is a style that I have had many friends ask me to do in the past and I gave it an attempt with my Imperial Fist Lysander and also my Eldar wraithlord and they turned out well to a certain extent; both of these models have picked up painting awards in the past.

I felt that I needed to get back to basics with the technique, since doing yellow NMM takes a lot more than I suspected and I realise now that there’s a fine line between painting NMM gold and simply bright yellow.

I found that I had a dwarven Demon Slayer model that is really quite old now. It is one of my favourite models and I have to say that I have always had a soft spot for dwarves. The contrast that you can achieve with the flesh tones and wacky colour hair is really attractive to me and then there is the ability to do some freehand facial tattoos on some of the more rare units, I wanted to keep this model’s flesh clear of tattoos. They are a slow army in the game, so there was my hesitation; they could do with a little speed.

When I was painting the model, I  painted about 95% of the model, not including the areas that required NMM, then moved into the NMM. Tackling one area of NMM silver first, I just practiced where I felt that the light was going to hit it, with sharp contrasts with areas that had little or no light. It didn’t look especially effective. This was a small mistake, but could be easily corrected. I quickly realised that in order for the technique to look correct, I needed to paint all the areas that required the NMM, as the key its to “trick” the eye into seeing the paint look reflective, when it in fact, is just the contrasts between all the different tones. It is not unlike regular painting, where some kind of visual trickery is used.

Bringing all the NMM together was the final work on the gold NMM. I found this to be a little harder to pull off, since I was using more than three paints (silver NMM actually uses Codex Grey, Skull White and Chaos Black). Gold NMM uses a combination of yellows, browns and finally, a very small amount of Chaos Black, which was my added twist to the great NMM painting guide. Another difference between NMM gold and silver,that I learned from the NMM guide mentioned above, is the lack of use of pure white highlight when painting gold. Many other sites did use a final touch of white to reflect the light, but this really detracted from the overall effect of gold NMM (thanks Quadrille).

I hope you like the finished product, I think that for my first attempt, it turned out pretty well, thanks to Quadrille of http://warhammer-empire.com/theforum/?topic=10116.0, for writing such a helpful guide.

Dwarf Demon Slayer. This was a first attempt of doing NMM with a painting guide, from someone who knows quite a bit about painting in that style

The finished Slayer

Please feel free to post comments on feedback for the model. They are always welcomed.